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The practice will be closed for Staff Training from 12.00-2pm on Tuesday 30th April 2024
Do you know we offer an eConsult service as a means of contacting the practice. Follow the link below under Access our Online Tools
It is practice policy to NOT issue Seat Belt exemption certificates other than in exceptional circumstances. We will always encourage patients to wear seat belts.
From the 1st of November 2023 how we handle urine samples, for possible UTI's, across the surgeries changed. Females age between 16-64yrs, can access treatment from several local pharmacies. Follow the link under Access our Online Tools
The practice will be closed from 6.pm on Friday 3rd & 24th May and will re-open at 8.30am on Tuesday 7th and 28th May 2024
The practice will be closed from 12 noon on Wednesday 17th April 2024 and will re-open at 8.30am on Thursday 18th April 2024
The car park directly to the front of the building is being resurfaced on SATURDAY 20TH APRIL. The practice is closed on this day, but residents and other members of the public are kindly asked NOT to use the car park on this date.

When do I need a fit note?

If you're off work sick for 7 days or less, your employer should not ask for medical evidence that you've been ill. Instead they can ask you to confirm that you've been ill. You can do this by filling in a form yourself when you return to work. This is called self-certification.

If you're off work sick for more than 7 days, your employer will usually ask for a fit note (or Statement of Fitness for Work) from a healthcare professional. Fit notes are sometimes referred to as medical statements or doctor's notes.

When you work out the number of days that you've been sick, you need to count all the days in a row you've been sick, including days you do not usually work, such as weekends and bank holidays.

If you need a fit note, contact the healthcare professional treating you. This should be a doctor, nurse, occupational therapist, pharmacist or physiotherapist.

Your healthcare professional will assess you, and if they decide your health affects your fitness for work, they can issue a fit note and advise either that:

  • you are "not fit for work"
  • you "may be fit for work taking into account the following advice"

Your healthcare professional will choose the "may be fit for work" option if they think that you are able to do some work, even if it is not your usual job, with support from your employer.

Discuss this advice with your employer to see if you can return to work. For example, the healthcare professional treating you may suggest possible changes, such as:

  • returning to work gradually, for example, by starting part time
  • temporarily working different hours
  • performing different duties or tasks
  • having other support to do your job. For example, if you have back pain, avoiding heavy lifting

If your employer is unable to accommodate the changes advised by a healthcare professional, then the fit note is treated as though it said "not fit for work".

There is never a charge from a healthcare professional for providing a fit note if you're off sick from work for more than 7 days.

For sickness of 7 days or less, your GP practice may charge you to provide a private medical certificate.

For example, some employers may request medical evidence from employees who repeatedly take time off sick, even if each time they're off work it's for 7 days or less. A fit note cannot be used for this purpose and a healthcare professional may charge to issue a private certificate.