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The practice will be closed for Staff Training from 12.00-2pm every Tuesday (12-2) in February and March
Do you know we offer an eConsult service as a means of contacting the practice. Follow the link below under Access our Online Tools
It is practice policy to NOT issue Seat Belt exemption certificates other than in exceptional circumstances. We will always encourage patients to wear seat belts.
From the 1st of November 2023 how we handle urine samples, for possible UTI's, across the surgeries changed. Females age between 16-64yrs, can access treatment from several local pharmacies. Follow the link under Access our Online Tools

Are complementary therapies safe during pregnancy?

In general, you should avoid taking any unnecessary medicines or treatments when you're pregnant. There are very few high-quality studies into the effectiveness of complementary or "alternative" treatments, and anything you take into your body can affect your unborn baby.

Complementary medicines and treatments include a wide range of treatments that are not usually used by most doctors in the UK. These treatments are sometimes described as alternative medicine. However, "complementary" is a better description, as they should be used alongside, but never replace, the treatment offered by your doctor.

Few complementary or alternative medicines are known to be safe during pregnancy. And some herbal remedies, such as blue cohosh, can actually be harmful to your baby.

But there is some evidence to support the use of acupressure and ginger for nausea and vomiting in pregnancy (morning sickness). Although it usually resolves by week 16 to 20 of your pregnancy.

If you're considering using a complementary therapy, it's important to tell your GP or midwife about what treatment you're considering. If you then decide to use a complementary therapy, you should always consult a qualified practitioner.

You can get more information about qualified or registered practitioners from the organisations below:

Homeopaths do not have to be registered with a regulatory body.

Complementary and alternative medicine should not replace conventional antenatal care. It's important to attend regular antenatal check-ups throughout your pregnancy.