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The practice will be closed for Staff Training from 12.00-2pm every Tuesday (12-2) in February and March
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It is practice policy to NOT issue Seat Belt exemption certificates other than in exceptional circumstances. We will always encourage patients to wear seat belts.
From the 1st of November 2023 how we handle urine samples, for possible UTI's, across the surgeries changed. Females age between 16-64yrs, can access treatment from several local pharmacies. Follow the link under Access our Online Tools

Is pneumonia contagious?

Pneumonia is swelling (inflammation) of the tissue in one or both lungs. It's usually caused by an infection, most commonly bacteria and viruses, which are both contagious.

Catching pneumonia

The germs that can cause pneumonia are usually breathed in. People often have small amounts of germs in their nose and throat that can be passed on through:

  • coughs and sneezes – these launch tiny droplets of fluid containing germs into the air, which someone else can breathe in
  • touching an object and transferring germs on to it – someone else can touch this object and then touch their own mouth or nose

Preventing the spread of pneumonia

You can help prevent the spread of a pneumonia by taking some simple hygiene precautions.

These include:

  • washing your hands regularly and thoroughly, particularly after touching your nose and mouth, and before handling food
  • using hand sanitiser if soap and water are not available
  • coughing and sneezing into a tissue, then throwing it away immediately and washing your hands
  • not sharing cups or kitchen utensils with others

Vaccination

Pneumococcal vaccine

The pneumococcal vaccine protects against Streptococcus pneumoniae, which is the most common cause of bacterial pneumonia.

Vaccination is recommended for:

  • babies at 12 weeks and 1 year old (on or after their first birthday)
  • adults aged 65 or over
  • children and adults with certain long-term health conditions, such as a serious heart or kidney condition

Find out more about who should have the pneumococcal vaccine.

The pneumococcal vaccine is usually given as part of the routine NHS child vaccination schedule. If you're unsure if you or your child has been given the vaccine, check with your GP.

Flu vaccine

The flu vaccine helps protect against pneumonia caused by flu.

Find out who can have the flu vaccine.

Further information

How long will I be infectious after starting antibiotics?