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The practice will be closed for Staff Training from 12.00-2pm on Tuesday 30th April 2024
Do you know we offer an eConsult service as a means of contacting the practice. Follow the link below under Access our Online Tools
It is practice policy to NOT issue Seat Belt exemption certificates other than in exceptional circumstances. We will always encourage patients to wear seat belts.
From the 1st of November 2023 how we handle urine samples, for possible UTI's, across the surgeries changed. Females age between 16-64yrs, can access treatment from several local pharmacies. Follow the link under Access our Online Tools
The practice will be closed from 6.pm on Friday 3rd & 24th May and will re-open at 8.30am on Tuesday 7th and 28th May 2024
The practice will be closed from 12 noon on Wednesday 17th April 2024 and will re-open at 8.30am on Thursday 18th April 2024
The car park directly to the front of the building is being resurfaced on SATURDAY 20TH APRIL. The practice is closed on this day, but residents and other members of the public are kindly asked NOT to use the car park on this date.

How should I care for my plaster cast?

Plaster casts are made up of a bandage and a hard covering, usually plaster of paris. They allow broken bones in the arm or leg to heal by holding them in place, and usually need to stay on for between 4 and 12 weeks.

Taking good care of your cast will help ensure a better recovery.

Keep your arm or leg raised on a soft surface, such as a pillow, for as long as possible in the first few days. This will help any swelling to go down.

Do not get your plaster cast wet. This will weaken it, and your bone will no longer be properly supported.

It's possible to buy special covers for plaster casts to keep them dry when washing or bathing. Ask a pharmacist for more information. Do not try to use plastic bags, bin liners, cling film or similar to keep the cast dry, as these are not reliable methods.

If your cast gets wet, contact your hospital or minor injuries unit for advice as soon as possible.

Always remove any covering as soon as you can to avoid causing sweating, which could also damage the cast.

Even if the plaster cast makes your skin feel very itchy, do not poke anything underneath it. This could cause a nasty sore and lead to infection.

Do not walk on a cast unless you have been told it is safe to do so and have been given a plaster shoe.

The itchiness should settle down after a few days.

  • exercise any joints that are not covered by the cast – such as your elbow, knee, fingers or toes – to help improve your circulation
  • avoid getting small objects, powders and sprays inside your cast, as they could irritate your skin
  • do not try to alter the length or position of your cast
  • do not lift anything heavy or drive until the cast has been removed
  • use crutches or a sling as advised by your health professional
  • use painkillers if you experience any pain
  • you can usually return to school or work with a cast, but you should avoid strenuous activities that may damage the broken bone or cast

You should contact your local hospital or minor injuries unit for advice if:

  • your plaster cast still feels too tight after keeping it elevated for 24 hours
  • you experience persistent itching or a burning sensation under the cast
  • your fingers or toes on the affected limb feel swollen, tingly, painful (even after taking painkillers) or numb
  • your fingers or toes turn blue or white
  • your cast feels too loose
  • your cast is broken or cracked
  • the skin underneath or around the edge of your cast feels sore
  • there is an unpleasant smell or discharge coming from your cast

You can also call NHS 111 for 24-hour advice.